Click on the banners below to go to the websites you want to go. Or click on the link in the menu above.

Click on the Banner to go to TV Series on Blu-Ray Releases
Click on the Banner to go to TV Series on Blu-Ray Releases

TV Shows on Blu-Ray - Gives you an idea which sci-fi TV Series have been released on Blu-Ray. Mainly focussed on North America and the UK but releases in other countires will also be added. When you are on this overview, you can click on a certain TV Series title where you see the Blu-Ray releases in more detail. This is a work in progress, not all titles have this link yet. Click on one of the 2 banners above to go to the Blu-Ray TV Series section or go via the menu above.

Click on the Banner to go to Movies on Blu-Ray Releases
Click on the Banner to go to Movies on Blu-Ray Releases

Movies on Blu-Ray - I don't think it will ever be complete, I try to post as many movies I think belong here, to give you an idea which sci-fi movies have been released on Blu-Ray. Mainly focussed on North America and the UK. Click on one of the 2 banners above to go to the Blu-Ray Movie section or go via the menu above.

3D Movies on Blu-Ray - Suggested by another sci-fi/blu-ray fan, thank you. More and more movies get a 3D release in the cinema and also on Blu-Ray. I myself am not the biggest fan of 3D, till now I watched 4 or 5 movies in 3D in the cinema but never watched comfortable with 3D glasses upon my own glasses. Still it's a good addition to this page, it's becoming more and more standard. I will use the same overview as the standard Blu-Ray release. Mainly focussed on North America and the UK. Click on one of the 2 banners above to go to the Blu-Ray Movie section or go via the menu above. (Still under construction)

Regio A - North-America, Japan, ..

Regio B - Europe, Australia, ..

Regio C - Asia, Russia,..

 

As oppose to the DVD's, Blu-Ray movies often are being released as regionfree. So Blu-Ray discs from Europe, Asia and from the North-America often can be played in your own Blu-Ray player at home. There are a number of websites on which you can find this info. Below you have a number of sites were you can check if a movie is regionfree or not.

 

http://www.blu-ray.com/

http://movietyme.blogspot.com/

http://bluray.liesinc.net/index.php

Difference between 1080p & 1080i

With the introduction of the HD DVD and Blu-ray high definition disc formats, as well as HDTV's that are capable of HDTV's highest resolution of 1920x1080, the terms 1080i and 1080p are being thrown around much more than ever before.

 

The big difference in the terms, of course, is the i (for interlaced) and (for progressive), which indicate how the image is stored and how it is displayed.

In the analog world of televisions, interlaced vs. progressively scanned video was an important distinction. Interlacing involves showing every other line of video in one frame and then supplying the remaining lines on the next pass. Standard analog television signals are interlaced by necessity, because standard analog TV's were never designed to handle anything but an interlaced signal.

 

New HDTV's are inherently progressively scanned devices. Their circuitry displays video all at once, so if they receive interlaced signals, those signals are de-interlaced to progressive signals before they are displayed. Until recently, few HDTV's could accept a 1080p signal due to cost savings or other technical limitations. HDTV's capable of only the lower 1280x720 HDTV resolution will usually only accept interlaced video at the higher 1920x1080 resolution.

Both HD DVD and Blu-ray store movie-based video on the discs in 1080p at 24 frames per second (fps). Some players do not output 1080p, but rather 1080i due to the circuitry implemented in the player for cost-savings or product maturity reasons.

 

Most displays are not capable of accepting a 1080p signal at 24 frames per second. More than likely, they need a 1080p signal at 60 frames per second (if they can take 1080p at all), so the conversion from 24 fps to 60 fps still needs to happen somewhere (this conversion is called 3:2, or 2:3, pulldown). The fact that most TV's cannot handle 1080p24 is why most HD DVD players and Blu-ray players alike output 1920x1080 at 60 fps in either interlaced or progressive fashion.

Does this mean that you're losing picture quality if your player is outputting 1080i, or your TV is only capable of accepting 1080i? As long as your TV is capable of displaying 1920x1080 pixels on the screen, and its internal circuitry was designed properly, there won't be any difference between a 1080i and 1080p input. The HDTV will deinterlace the 1080i signal, create a 1080p signal from it, and then display it to you. Unlike in the old days of analog video, there is no information lost or artifacts introduced as a result of the deinterlacing process. All the information is there, it just has to be reassembled.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1080p

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1080i

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Online since April 11, 2011